The Anatomy of an Event Registration Form - 123ContactForm Blog

The Anatomy of an Event Registration Form

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December 19, 2011

The Anatomy of an Event Registration Form

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There are several must-have sections in an appealing event registration form. Users should get, in one place, a brief event description and the possibility to register. This way, you’ll strengthen their wish to attend your event, you’ll be crystal clear from the beginning and you’ll receive a clean, consistent guest list at the end.

Let’s have a look at the 123ContactForm online registration template. It’s a good starting point for any event registration form you’ll build from now on. We’ll see what those registration form must-have‘s are and how they should be approached for best results.

Christmas Party Online Registration Form

1. Logo. If the event is planned by an organization, be sure to include its logo in the registration form. Guests will know for sure who their host will be and you’ll gain exposure for the organization.

2. Title. Use a short and descriptive title. Make it clear that it’s an event registration form that follows and, if possible, integrate the one or two keywords the event revolves around. Never skip the title – what’s obvious for you doesn’t have to be so for others.

3. Brief event description. Tell or remind future guests what the event is about, where it takes place and when it’s going to happen. Don’t assume that users are familiar with these vital aspects. Instead, set up this section, which leaves no room for doubt.

4. Map. Maps have multiple benefits: a. They give indications. 🙂 b. They show how thoughtful the host is. c. They add visual impact to the registration form. d. They anchor a future event in the present and fuel users’ determination to attend it.

5. Guest’s name. This is the first field that requests user input. Split it into First and Last, to avoid any confusion should you want to give badges or send out cards.

6. Guest’s contact data. Include any contact information category that is relevant for your event. Phone numbers should be required, to make possible any quick, last-minute conversation. Guests’ addresses – electronic or physical – can be used to mail invitations, thank you letters or any other types of message.

7. Number of guests. After you’ve collected names and contact information, it’s time to see what other details could be useful. Ask guests to specify how many persons will be joining them or what type of tequila they prefer – anything that helps in planning the event.

8. Comments or questions. Up to now, all fields were required. The last section – Comments or questions – is optional for guests, but mandatory for you. Provide users with the means of asking a question or giving any additional information.

9. Register button. It’s the tip of toes in what registration form anatomy is concerned. Replace button text with “Join us!”, “Here I come!” or “Let’s get the party started!”.

Alexandra Draghici
Alexandra Draghici
is the Project Manager of 123ContactForm. She tracks our project development and acts as a link between departments. Alexandra likes web technologies and teaching online and offline.

3 Comments

  1. word says:

    This is cool guys, I can see that it could be very useful for us in the near future.
    It is good to see you are varying the forms and striding out in new directions.
    When I think back to when i first joined you and look at you today you have certainly come a long way in a short time.

  2. Alexandra says:

    Thank you and we’ll do our best to keep up with your needs and expectations.

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